He is a dreamer like yourself. You both dream of another world that does not exist, and never will.

17/02/2009

“Her heart did whisper that he had done it for her. But it was a hope shortly checked by other considerations, and she soon felt that even her vanity was insufficient, when required to depend on his affection for her— for a woman who had already refused him— as able to overcome a sentiment so natural as abhorrence against relationship with Wickham.”

– Jane Austen

Take me back to those times, to times when unintentional glances were the beginnings of an epic romance, where subtle concise vocabulary determined whether you were  admired or not. Now you think you’re in love when you are described as “hot”. Back in the day being romanced was not about just buying a dozen red roses as the local grocery store and a cheap Walgreens chocolate heart. It was about feeling wanted in a simple and sophisticated way. All romance is today is just a movie genre and an excuse for Hallmark’s existence.

Back in the time of Dukes and Duchesses, of detailed gowns and exuberant jewelery, of seven course meals and extravagant balls, everything just seemed more romantic. Electricity had yet to be invented, so dark rooms were lightened by candlelight as it shimmered off the room’s occupants’ flesh.  Today, in a time of guys and chicks, of mini skirts and tongue piercings, of half a dozen tequila shots and jam-packed nightclubs, things have changed. At sunset, the horndogs come out and our vision becomes impaired in dark rooms brightened by electric lights, blinding our eyes and our senses. With each others tongue down our throats, we have yet to realize the near extinction of romance.

 Lady Georgiana Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire by Thomas Gainsborough

Lady Georgiana Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire by Thomas Gainsborough

However, the seventeenth century carried with it mischievous lies and cruel affairs. Condemned to eternal unhappiness through fixed marriages, most found comfort in a different bed than their spouses’. Then again, is that really any different than today?

I’ll take the good with the bad.

Take me back,

Laura Marianne

“She’d stopped reading the kind of women’s magazine that talked about romance and knitting, and started reading the kind of women’s magazine that talked about orgasms, but apart from making a mental note to have one if ever the occasion presented itself she dismissed them as only romance and knitting in a new form.”

– Terry Pratchett, Good Omens, 1990

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4 Responses to “He is a dreamer like yourself. You both dream of another world that does not exist, and never will.”

  1. Karen said

    Well, I don’t think the nature of love has changed at all. Love and romance in the 17C weren’t any different from love and romance today. What you’re talking about is the commercialization of love. You don’t have to buy hallmark cards, Walgreens chocolates, or hot-house grown long-stem red roses. A walk along the ocean beach at sunset can be as romantic as gowns and jewelry at an extravagant ball, depending on who you’re with and what you’re feeling.

  2. Shini said

    All agreed, and “It was about feeling wanted in a simple and sophisticated way.” Good line. Love seems to have corrupted, Although yeah the feeling of ‘love’ is the same now as it was hundreds of years ago, the expression was much more classy back then. Thinking about it, everything was done with more passion and grandeur – the dresses, the hair, the simple way of expression in life… and I’m not only thinking about royalty.. Good post, love the new layout btw.

  3. Shini said

    (you write the best comments ever)

  4. i disagree with karen. i think it’s important to show people exactly how many dollars worth you love them.

    otherwise what’s the point?

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